Today in Michigan History

April 13, 1896

Baseball was played at Michigan & Trumbull for the first time.

The Detroits, as the Tigers were known then, played a local semi-professional team called the Athletics. The Detroits clobbered the Athletics with a six-run first inning that helped end the game 30-3.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

April 6, 1971

Detroit Tigers had their largest opening-day attendance.

The Tigers beat Cleveland 8-2 before the largest opening-day crowd, 54,089, in the team’s history.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

February 19, 1970

Tigers’ pitcher Denny McLain was suspended.

Professional baseball’s last 30-game winner, McLain was the first major-league baseball player suspended since 1924. McLain was later sent to prison when found guilty of charges of racketeering.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

February 2, 1936

Ty Cobb became one of the first players selected to enter the newly formed Baseball Hall of Fame.

According to many observers, Ty Cobb may have been baseball’s greatest player. His batting accomplishments are legendary—a lifetime average of .367, 297 triples, 4,191 hits, 12 batting titles (including nine in a row), 23 straight seasons in which he hit over .300, three .400 seasons (topped by a .420 mark in 1911), and 2,245 runs. Nicknamed “The Georgia Peach,” Cobb stole 892 bases during a 24-year career, primarily with the Detroit Tigers.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

December 18, 1920

Ty Cobb took over as manager of the Detroit Tigers.

On his thirty-fourth birthday, Ty Cobb replaced longtime manager Hughie Jennings as manager of the Detroit Tigers. Cobb, who had to be talked into taking the job, took it partly because it was rumored that Clarence Rowland, the former White Sox manager whom Cobb did not feel was qualified, would be selected to lead the Tigers.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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