Today in Michigan History

March 17, 1929

Social discourse was banned in Detroit.

An angry president of the University of Detroit threatened to expel a coed caught talking to boys. “It would not be so bad,” he added, “if they were content to talk with one boy at a time, but they insist on chatting with seven or eight.”

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Featured Business: Uncle Goose Blocks

The Blocks that Uncle Goose Bulit

Uncle Goose was founded by William Bultman in 1983 and the tradition of these fine wooden blocks has been continued by William’s sons, Pete and Scott. Today, Lindenwood Inc. manufactures the blocks in Michigan and distributes the Uncle Goose line around the world.

The Bultman brothers have expanded their father’s vision from ABC blocks to include over a dozen foreign languages, American Sign Language, Braille, nursery rhymes, bugs, Presidents, and math.  Lindenwood also accepts custom orders.

The 1.75” cubes are handcrafted from Michigan basswood that is farmed – planted and harvested on industry-managed land around the Great Lakes.  Lindenwood’s manufacturing process minimizes waste, both in production and packaging. They use only child-safe, non-toxic inks.

Ninety-Nine percent of everything used is local to West Michigan and all of the production is done in Grand Rapids.
The Uncle Goose brand has been honored with Parent Choice Awards, Dr. Toy’s “100 Best Toys” award, and Oppenheim Toy Portfolio awards.

For more information or to order a set of Uncle Goose blocks, visit Lindenwood’s website at www.lindenwoodinc.com

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Today in Michigan History

March 16, 1847

Governor Greenly signed a bill moving the state capital from Detroit to Lansing Township.

When Michigan finally entered the Union in 1837, it was determined that within ten years a new state capital needed to be chosen. There was great competition for the site. Many legislators wanted to move the capital from Detroit because of frightening memories of the British invasion and occupation of Michigan’s biggest city in the War of 1812. After much debate, a site in Ingham County’s Lansing Township was selected.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 12, 1974

Michigan made itself exempt from daylight savings time.

Michigan was the first state to exempt itself from year-round nationwide daylight savings time imposed by the federal government to save fuel during a shortage. Michigan took action when a study showed the time change increased traffic hazards for kids walking to and from school in the dark.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Check out this week’s featured business: Trattoria Stella

Nestled in the old Traverse City Asylum, Trattoria Stella offers Traverse City residents and patrons from around the state delicious food made from the finest ingredients, quite a bit from area farmers, and a great wine selection, many from local wineries.  Many of the ingredients and wines come from within 20 miles of their kitchen door,  which supports their local area businesses while getting the freshest, most flavorful ingredients.  Nearly everything is made in-house: bread, desserts, pasta sauces, dressings, etc.

Paul and Amanda both grew up in Birmingham, Michigan and are passionate about great food.  Paul has managed some of southeastern Michigan’s most notable restaurants, including Sweet Loraine’s in Southfield, Big Rock Chop & Brew House in Birmingham, and D’Amato’s in Royal Oak and Ann Arbor. It was at D’Amato’s where Paul first worked with Myles Anton, Trattoria Stella’s Executive Chef.

Amanda’s passion for training took her around the world to open new restaurants with Dallas-based T.G.I. Fridays and Detroit-based Elias Brothers Corporation among others.  Amanda is a sommelier currently working towards her master sommelier accreditation.  Trattoria Stella has quickly earned the reputation as one of the best wine cellars in the region thanks to Amanda.

Trattoria Stella takes to heart the fact that the community supports them and their continued success. They, in turn, continue to encourage a healthy and happy community through education.  Last year, they accomplished their goal of giving back one percent of their gross sales to local charitable organizations.

For more information or to visit Trattoria Stella, please visit: www.stellatc.com

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Today in Michigan History

March 11, 1861

Keweenaw County was organized.

In the 1840s hundreds of people flocked to the Keweenaw Peninsula—a slender, rugged protrusion jutting sixty miles into Lake Superior. They came for copper. Eastern investors, speculators, adventurers and miners journeyed to the isolated region of the western Upper Peninsula in what became the nation’s first mineral rush. The copper rush led to the organization of Keweenaw County; Eagle River was chosen the county seat.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 10, 1953

Alexander Groesbeck died in Detroit.

One of Michigan’s most successful chief executives, Alexander Groesbeck is credited with reorganizing state government. Although he was called, “aloof as a politician and dictatorial as governor,” Groesbeck was elected governor three times (1920, 1922 and 1924). He also lost his party’s nomination on three other occasions (1926, 1930 and 1934). A Republican, Groesbeck was born in Macomb County and worked in his father’s sawmill before attending the University of Michigan where he graduated with a law degree. Groesbeck was buried in Detroit.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 9, 1976

Hot-air balloons flights over the state were legalized.

Governor William B. Milliken signed legislation that made manned hot-air balloon flights from and over Michigan legal. This law ended a ban over the sale and use of such balloons that had been in effect since 1931.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 8, 1869

Michigan ratified the Fifteenth Amendment.

The last of three Civil War amendments to the U.S. Constitution, the Fifteenth Amendment guarantees that U.S. citizens shall not be denied the right to vote based on race, color or previous condition of servitude. The amendment was introduced when it became clear that former slaves were being disenfranchised in the former states of the Confederacy.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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