Today in Michigan History

March 31, 1976

Turning right on red was made OK.

A new traffic law went into effect, which allowed drivers to make right turns after stopping at a red light. The law was adopted in part to conserve fuel.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 30, 1815

Detroiters celebrated the war’s end.

The War of 1812 left Detroit impoverished. When word reached Michigan about the Treaty of Ghent, which ended America’s second war with Great Britain, Detroiters gathered at Ben Woodworth’s Hotel and held what is called a Pacification Ball to celebrate the war’s formal end.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 26, 1859

Articles of incorporation were adopted by Adrian College.

In 1840, a group of disenchanted Michigan Methodists seceded from the Michigan Episcopal Church and organized themselves in a conference bearing the name Wesleyan Methodist Connection. This led to the founding of the Leoni Theological Institute in 1848 near Jackson, Michigan. Eventually, the school’s name was changed to Michigan Union College. In 1857, the Reverend Asa Mahan became pastor of the Plymouth Congregational church in Adrian. Hearing the Michigan Union College was in financial trouble, Mahan worked to move the school to Adrian. To keep local residents from discovering the hegira, the school’s library and its students were transported under the cover of the night to Adrian where the name Adrian College was adopted. By 1862, Adrian College had a student enrollment of 82 women and 133 men.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

March 25, 1680

La Salle and his men left Fort Miami to explore interior Michigan.

French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle and five other men left Fort Miami (present-day St. Joseph) to journey across the southern Lower Peninsula. Battling cold temperatures, snow, swamps and Indians, La Salle’s men reached Niagara on April 4, 1680, becoming the first Europeans to see the interior of the Lower Peninsula.

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Today in Michigan History

March 24, 1936

The Red Wings played the longest Stanley Cup game in history.

The Detroit Red Wings played an NHL Stanley Cup play-off game against the Montreal Maroons that combined 60 minutes of regulation play and 116 minutes, 30 seconds of overtime. Detroit won 1-0 and went on to win the series and their first Stanley Cup.

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Today in Michigan History

March 23, 1984

The state’s first test-tube baby was born.

A woman from Hazel Park gave birth to the 7 pound, 13 ounce baby boy. Doctors had removed four eggs from the woman, fertilized them with her husband’s sperm, and then transferred one fertile egg back into the mother where the baby developed normally.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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