Today in Michigan History

February 18, 1977

A hot-air balloon record was set.

Karl Thomas, a 28-year-old adventurer from Troy, Michigan, landed his hot-air balloon on a remote island 15 miles northeast of Jacksonville, Florida, ending a record 18-day solo voyage across the United States.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

February 17, 1864

The First Michigan Colored Infantry was mustered into federal service.

Detroiter Henry Barns commanded Michigan’s first and only African American regiment. The First, soon re-designated the 102nd U.S. Colored Infantry, left Michigan for Hilton Head, South Carolina, with an enrollment of 895 officers and men.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

February 16, 1935

Sonny Bono was born in Detroit.

Born Salvatore Philip Bono, Bono was better known as “Sonny.” Bono’s “I Got You Babe,” released in 1965, one year after his marriage to Cherilyn La Pierre, left the singing duo a national success story. After music and divorce, Bono entered politics and served as mayor of Palm Springs, California. He died in a skiing accident in January 1998.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

February 12, 1781

A Spanish force captured British-held Fort St. Joseph.

Once an important French fort on the route to the Mississippi River, Fort St. Joseph (present-day Niles, Michigan) had fallen into disrepair under the control of the British and was an easy target for a force of Spaniards who traveled from St. Louis, Missouri. The Spaniards’ one-day occupation of Fort St. Joseph allowed Niles residents to boast later that theirs was the only Michigan community over which four flags (French, British, Spanish and American) had flown.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Featured Business: The Cupcake Station

The Cupcake Station:  Helping people one cupcake at a time

One of Kerry Johnson’s passions in life is cupcakes, but an even greater passion of his is helping people.  When he decided that it was time for a new venture in life, he started The Cupcake Station, and has kept his passion for helping people as an integral part of the cupcake business.  Today, The Cupcake Station has helped over 2,000 different organizations.  The Cupcake Station is now accepting applications for Franchises with one “condition.”  The future franchise owner must stay true to the roots of The Cupcake Station; giving back to the community.

Over 25 varieties of cupcakes are made daily from scratch.  Their most popular cupcake is the Carrot Cake Cupcake followed closely by the Michigan Bumpy Cupcake.  The Michigan Bumpy Cupcake features Dark Chocolate Cake with smooth White Buttercream bumps dipped in Dark Chocolate Ganache and drizzled with White Chocolate.  The Cupcake Station created this little piece of Heaven in homage to Sanders, another Michigan institution.   The Cupcake Station was the first to come out with The Michigan Bumpy Cupcake, which was featured on the national news.  Now, cupcake stores nationwide have started making Michigan Bumpy Cupcakes.

Currently, there are two locations, Birmingham and Ann Arbor that employ 22 people.  During the week, they sell 500-700 cupcakes per day and an additional 1,200 – 2,000 per day on weekends.   This weekend many more cupcakes will be flying off the shelves since Valentine’s Day is their busiest holiday of the year.  The Cupcake Station now ships its amazing cupcakes nationwide.

For locations or franchise information, please visit: www.cupcakestation.com.

Today in Michigan History

February 11, 1937

The Flint Sit-down Strike ended in victory for the workers.

Hailed as one of the most important strikes in American history, the 44-day strike in Flint, Michigan, ended when General Motors recognized the United Auto Workers as the sole bargaining unit for its workers. Within a year, the UAW saw its membership grow from 30,000 to 500,000 members. The Flint Sit-down Strike was, as the British Broadcasting System later noted, “the strike heard ’round the world.”

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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