Top Ten Tuesday – Mi Thanksgiving Traditions

Based on the input from our readers, here are the Top Ten Michigan Thanksgiving Traditions:

10. Leftovers!!

9. Preparing for Black Friday

8. The overstuffed drive home

7. Spending time with the Family

6. Pumpkin Pie

5. Turkey & Mashed Potatoes

4. Watching non-Lions football

3. Putting up Holiday decorations the day after

2. Watching America’s Thanksgiving Parade

1. Watching the Lions Game

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Today in Michigan History

November 17, 1829

David H. Jerome was born in Detroit.

A wealthy hardware and lumber businessman from Saginaw, Jerome was elected governor in 1880. He has the distinction of being Michigan’s first native-born governor. Jerome lost his reelection bid to Fusionist Josiah w. Begole, the candidate of the Democrats and the Greenbacks.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 16, 1926

Commune leader Benjamin Purnell was arrested.

In 1895, Benjamin Purnell, a Kentucky-born itinerant preacher, declared himself the seventh in a series of messengers foretold in the Book of Revelation. For the next several years, Purnell and his wife, Mary, spread their message throughout the Midwest. In 1903 they settled in Benton Harbor, Michigan, and founded a religious communal society called the House of David. The House of David thrived, but immorality scandals plagued the commune and its leader. When state authorities arrested Purnell they charged him with fraud and immortality. The two-month trial ended badly for the House of David, leaving the 66-year-old Purnell exhausted. He soon died.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 13, 1972

Michigan’s first state lottery ticket was sold.

After voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment allowing Michigan to establishment a lottery, Governor William Milliken signed Public Act 239 creating the Michigan State Lottery. He appointed Gus Harrison as the lottery’s first commissioner. Although Milliken purchased the lottery’s first 50-cent green game ticket, when the drawing was made eleven days later, he was not the winner.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 12, 1883

The Akeley sank in Lake Michigan.

At 10:30 P.M. the previous evening, the pipe supplying water to the Akeley‘s boiler was ripped off due to high seas. Soon chains supporting the smokestack snapped. The 230-foot steamer drifted along as waves picked up indicating an impending storm. The captain ordered the men to lower the anchor so they could weather out the storm. As another vessel, the Driver, approached the stricken vessel, a big wave hit Akeley and the aft mass broke off the ship. The Akeley plunged to the bottom of the lake stern first. Twelve crewmembers survived the disaster; six were lost.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 11, 1918

The Great War came to an end.

After more than four years of fighting, World War I came to an end at the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. More than 175,000 Michiganders served in what was hailed as “the war to end all wars.” Many Michigan men served in the 32nd Division, which was known as the Red Arrow Division. Michiganders also composed much of the American Expeditionary Force that was sent to northern Russia in late 1918 to thwart the Bolshevik Revolution. Nicknamed the Polar Bears, these Americans did not return home until mid-1919.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 10, 1975 

The Edmund Fitzgerald sunk. 

One of the biggest and most profitable iron ore carriers on the Great Lakes, the 13,000-ton Edmund Fitzgerald disappeared in a snow squall as it neared Whitefish Bay in eastern Lake Superior. The loss of the entire 29-man crew made the Fitz the best-known—and largest—ship lost to the lakes.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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Today in Michigan History

November 9, 1775

Henry Hamilton arrived in Detroit.

The newly appointment British governor, Henry Hamilton, reached Detroit. During the upcoming American Revolution, Hamilton used Detroit as a base for raids on American colonists living on the frontier. He also acquired the nickname “the hair buyer” because of his practice of paying Native American allies for American scalps. After being captured leading a raid into southern Indiana later during the Revolution, Hamilton was imprisoned, but never returned to Detroit.

Thank you Michigan Start Pages for this glimpse into our past.  See more here.

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