Today in Michigan History

August 25, 1864

Michigan soldiers battled at Reams Station, Virginia.

A week of intense fighting ended outside of Petersburg, Virginia, near a place called Reams Station. Eleven different Michigan units were involved in the fighting that left many casualties, including Major Horatio Belcher of the Eighth Michigan Infantry, who was killed on August 19. The Flint officer had gone off to war three years earlier in August 1861.

Thank you Michigan History Magazine for this glimpse into our past.  See more at www.michiganhistorymagazine.com.

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Today in Michigan History

August 24, 1834

Cholera epidemic hit Detroit.

Dozens died throughout August and September, including one terrible day when sixteen perished from the dreaded disease. It had been the city’s custom to toll a bell on the occasion of a death but the tolling became so frequent that it increased the panic and was discontinued. Cholera returned to Detroit in 1849 and 1854.

Thank you Michigan History Magazine for this glimpse into our past.  See more at www.michiganhistorymagazine.com.

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Halloween Lover’s in Metro Detroit

The Motor City Haunt Club is having their 4th annual garage sale.  It will be on the campus of the University of Detroit Mercy (6 mile & Livernois in Detroit) starting at 10am and ending at 4pm.

For more information on the sale or membership in the Motor City Haunt Club, visit www.motorcityhauntclub.com.

Happy Haunting!

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Michigan Renaissance Festival

It’s that time of year again…the Michigan Renaissance Festival starts this weekend (August 22nd).  This weekend’s theme will be “Wild Days & Amazing Knights”.

Each of the seven weekends will have a different theme and various events scheduled around that theme.  For more information visit www.michrenfest.com for more information.

Huzzah!

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Today in Michigan History

August 21, 1984

The Chief Wawatam sailed for the last time.

After years of transporting passengers, automobiles and railcars across the Straits of Mackinac, the Chief Wawatam ended service. Built for the Mackinac Transportation Company for service between St. Ignace and Mackinaw City, the Chief Wawatam arrived at St. Ignace on October 18, 1911.

In 1988, the Chief Wawatam—the last coal-burning vessel on the Great Lakes—was sold to a Canadian firm that cut the 338-foot car ferry down to a deck barge.

Thank you Michigan History Magazine for this glimpse into our past.  See more at www.michiganhistorymagazine.com.

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Today in Michigan History

August 20, 1794

Americans won the Battle of Fallen Timbers.

After years of frustration and setbacks, American forces, led by General Anthony Wayne, defeated a force of Native Americans south of present-day Toledo, Ohio. Wayne’s victory at Battle of Fallen Timbers—so named because it occurred in an area where a tornado uprooted many trees before the battle—forced the British to finally surrender American outposts, like Detroit, which they had occupied since the end of the American Revolution.

Thank you Michigan History Magazine for this glimpse into our past.  See more at www.michiganhistorymagazine.com.

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